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's possible use of chemical weapons. >> brown: then, we examine the use of a one-drug lethal injection on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: and we assess the epidemic here in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the lliam and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
in its most important task on its agenda this year. >> brown: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice minced no words after russia and china once again vetoed a resolution that threatened sanctions on syria. >> one can only hope that one day before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow this council to play its proper role at center of the >> brown: it was the third time moscow and beijing have blocked u.n. efforts to make syrian president bashar al-assad stop the attacks on his own people. and this latest veto drew condemnation from country after country. >> mr. president today was an opportunity lost, history will show us price that the people in syria and beyond will have to pay. >> by exercising their veto today, russia and china are failing in their responsibilities as permanent members of the security council to help resolve the crisis in syria. >> ( translated ): in our judgment that resolution was best opportunity and perhaps the only opportunity to put an end to the mindless violence that affects the syrian arab republic. >> br
ten years when the u.s. first after september 11th invaded afghanistan. i don't know, some of you are too young to remember, but others of us might remember looking at our tv screens and seeing the pictures of these very fancy, new weapons that we had. this idea that we know had these precision weapons that would only target the people that we wanted to get and would not result in collateral damage. and it was almost a way to say to people, calmed down, don't be worried. we will be killing innocent people. so, i was worried because i don't have as sense that the latest and greatest new weapon is going to protect innocent people and went to afghanistan three weeks after the invasion with several other colleagues. it was before we even got into afghanistan on the border of pakistan that we found already people who would be considered collateral damage. the first young woman i met is somebody who sticks with me because she looked like my daughter. she was 13 years old. my daughter at that time was 13 years old. i felt an affinity with her and asked her if i could learn about her stor
say chinese authorities aren't transparent about their spending. the u.s. and japan and other countries are concerned about china's military muscle. the chinese government has been more aggressive in its campaign to force the claim over disputed islands in the region. analysts say it is partly intended to keep other countries in check over the disputes. >>> analysts are sounding the alarm about the naval buildup. their annual white paper says recent actions by chinese authorities are a grave concern for east asia and the rest of the world. this year's report says china's defense budget increased by 30 times over the past 24 years. defense officials believe the growth is from building aircraft carriers and say chinese leaders are dispatching war ships more frequently to the south china sea and east china sea. the latter is home to the senkaku islands. which both china and taiwan claim. the wipe paper claims ownership. defense officials will submit the report to the cabinet and then release it to the public by the end of this month. public anger over the deployment of military a
condition. it was the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since the killings of 32 people at virginia tech five years ago. we'll have more on the store after the headlines. syrian rebels continue to make gains on the regime of bashar al-assad, seizing a number of border crossings with neighboring iraq and turkey. opposition fighters overrun government forces at two major crossings, including one controlling the vital trade route on the damascus to baghdad highway. meanwhile, the syrian government says the country's intelligence chief, hisham ikhtiyar, has died from injuries sustained in wednesday's bombing of a high- level meeting in damascus, making him the fourth assad regime insider to die in the attack. and it's the violence, the united nations is warning 1 million syrians are now believed to be internally displaced, double the previous estimate. the fighting continues in syria one day after russia and china vetoed a security council resolution threatening new sanctions on the syrian regime. russia and china say they took action over demands for the inclusion of penalties under chapter seve
executive arnie gundersen about the report and what it means for u.s. plants. then a look at serious operations in africa and how the united states rendered, tortured and discarded one innocent man from tanzania. and protests against the u.s. mining giant newmont are escalating in peru. five participants in those protests have been killed in the past week. a state of emergency has been declared. >> the government is mistaken if it thinks it is going to crash the justified cries of the people. >> we will speak with amy goodman in spain today, 75 years after the bombing of that city. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm juan gonzalez. i am filling in for amy goodman. the u.s. and european union are calling for new sanctions on syria similar to those used against the gaddafi regime ahead of the nato attack on libya. at an international friends of syria gathering in paris, secretary of state clinton invoked the threat of chapter 7 under the u.n. charter, which ranges from economic embargos to military force. the news co
.n. security council after russia and china, again, exercised their veto power. the u.s. ambassador t tthe united nations says russia and china are protecting the syrian president and that thousands of civilians uld die as a result. susan rice spoke after the russian and chinese representatives at u.n. security council vetoed the latest resolution on the conflict in syria. the draft would have permitted nonmilitary sanctions if president assad's government refused to stop using heavy artillery within ten days and the resolution called for a 45-day extension of the u.n. cease-fire observers mission. the current term expires on friday. it's a third time russia and china have vetoed u.n. resolutions on syria. >> the security council has failed utterly. this is another dark day in turtle bay. one can only hope that one day, before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow -- >> western nations are expected to try to dlaft another resolution to extend the mission of the u.n. cease-fire observers. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon regrets the securi
will not hesitate to use chemical weapons -- the assad regime will not hesitate to use chemical weapons if things get worse. we go to the coast of honduras, where cocaine has become the country's curse. and running for gold. how an olympian overcame the odds to compete for america. >> when i look at where i came from, i have to pinch myself. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. tonight, the fighting in syria appears to be moving closer to the center of the capital, damascus. over the past couple days, clashes between government forces and rebel fighters have taken place in the southern suburbs of the city. now, even more worrying, syria's for ambassador to iraq, who defected last week, said that forces loyal to president saleh saad will not hesitate to use chemical weapons. -- syria's former ambassador to iraq, who defected last week, said that forces loyal to president assad will not hesitate to use chemical weapons. >> international diplomacy is struggling to find a way out. in these pictures, activists say people are trying to flee heavy shelling in damascus.
stores. he's on the phone with us. good morning. >> good morning. >> help us break down the stet lment. who is the real winner here? is it the retailer? >> unfortunately, it's not. the only winners are visa, mastercard and their banks. they have gotten a hall pass if this deal goes through. it's not a done deal. it's a proposal now. they have a hall pass to continue to raise their swipe fees without restraint and not have anybody be able to enforce the law against them. they have to be feeling good now. >> the swipe fee reduction is only for eight months. what could happen after that. it could go back up? >> i tell you, with the credit card companies, you always have to read the fine print. what you read this is remarkable. they are not even going to reduce the swipe fees for the eight months. what they are going to do is take the dollar value of that and roll it into the settlement. because there's nothing to change the structure of how they do things today, by the time the merchants actually get any of that money, swipe fees will have gone up by more than the amount of that money. me
>> welcome to the "journal." >> welcome. >> here is what we have coming up. >> u.s. treasury secretary timothy geithner comes to germany to talk about the european crisis. >> no ending to the fighting in of 0h. france calls for an urgent meeting of the u.n. security council. >> it trial begins in moscow. a fight between the president and an all-female punk band. >> well, it is usually a playground for germany's rich and famous, but today it was the scene of high end diplomacy in the eurozone debt crisis. >> the u.s. treasury secretary swept into the north sea island to see his german counterpart wolfgang scheuble who is on vacation there. >> the markets are hoping that a game-changer in the crisis could be on the way. that is after mario draghi promised last week to do all it takes to stabilize the euro. >> germany's finance minister cannot of charlie's get the debt crisis during his summer break. u.s. treasury secretary timothy geithner called on wolfgang short life ensued, to urge germany to work together with other eurozone states to resolve the crisis and boost confidence
>> clayton: thanks for joining us, tomorrow on the show, have you heard of this guy, running for student council. join us for the "after the show" show. >> alisyn: and massachusetts senator scott brown will be here and tune in for the "after the show" show. >> clayton: happy national ice cream day. >> jamie: good morning, a "fox news alert" for you. iran is threatening world supply of oil, the u.s. is taking this one very seriously. the rogue reggie regime saying it will block the gateway to the gulf and a narrow waterway known that's strait of hormuz and tehran says it will act if it feels its security is threatened. what does that mean? good morning, everyone i'm jamie colby, great to have you here. >> eric: i'm eric sean on this sunday morning, welcome to america's news headquarters. we know the strait of hormuz is a vital waterway, about 20%, 1/5 of the world's oil supply passes through the narrow strait. the lifeblood of many nations. now iran again vowing to increase its naval presence in international waters and even claiming it is developing a long range missile that
syrian government forces have their guns trained on oppositions in the commercial capital. u.s. state department officials are among those who believe the soldiers are preparing to attack aleppo. ban ki-moon used the site of a massacre in boss nia to call for an end to the civil war. jun takahashi reports. >> reporter: ban key man wrapped up his tour of the former yugoslavia by visiting a city that saw the worst of the war there. he visited srebrenitzah to remember the past but also to warn of what's happening else where right now. >> international community failed to to provide the necessary protection for many people who were killed at the time when they needed our support. >> reporter: troops were stationed in the area as u.n. peacekeepers, but they were outgunned and outmanned. boss knowian serb troops overran srebrenitzah in july, 1995. they separated man and boys from women and girls. then they slaughtered 8,000 of them on a remote mountainside. 17 years on, people in srebrenitzah are reminded of the massacre almost daily. scientists are still trying to find the remains o
. anyone can sell guns to those who regularly use the arms to kill their own people. >> how many guns had he got on you? >> 43. >> how many bananas? only to that, because that is regulated. >> justin brand. we'll speak with amnesty usa executive director suzanne nossel. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. at least 25 people have been killed and more than 50 wounded in a car bombing in the iraqi city of diwaania. crowdedack targeted a crowd o market. with sectarian attacks on the rise, at least 237 people were killed in iraq last month, making june 1 of the bloodiest since u.s. forces withdrew late last year. syrian president bashar al-assad has expressed regret for the downing of a turkish air jet that stoked tensions with neighboring turkey last month. speaking to a turkish newspaper, al-assad said he will not allow the incident to escalate into combat between the two countries. in other syria news, dozens of members of syria's opposition met in cairo on monday to formulate a new transition from al-assad's
leaders are calling on the u.s. to officially declare boko haram a terrorist organization. >> george: and joining us with more from our washington studio is pastor ario, who heads up the pentacostal fellowship and serves as president of a r very important organization in nigeria, called the christian organization of nigeria. great to have you on the broadcast. the united states government is hesitating from classifying boko haram as a terrorist organization. do you think this is a good move by our u.s. government? >> it is definitely, definitely a wrong move. they should, and they should do it quickly. >> george: and why, sir? >> because, you see, one of the most important things in a terrorist organization is the finance, the money. and when they designate them as a terrorist group, then all the different security organizations will be able to track where the money is coming from. if you get the money, then you get the organization. >> george: some in the u.s. government say that this group is, in essence, trying to embarrass the nigerian government, embarrass the nigerian president
troops leave. afghan president hamid karzai, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton and u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon will be among those attending the meeting on sunday. japanese officials are trying to negotiate a total package of $15 billion by 2015. the amount is expected to meet a request president karzai made. he wants the money for reconstruction and development after nato troops leave his country in 2014. >>> an afghan minister outlined where some of that funding will go in a speech ahead of sunday's meeting. wais barmak says continued international support is needed to revive his country's rural areas. barmak is the minister for rural rehabilitation and development. he made his appeal friday at a symposium in tokyo. >> major challenges remain. residual conflict continues to delay and destruct development, growth and peace building. >> barmak says access to drinking water and medical services has improved in some villages, but he insists $125 million will be necessary for the next three years to build water supply systems and schools. barmak adds if the afghan people were
nuclear weapons program, you give us legitimacy for what we are doing and a broad an deep nuclear program and we'll be satisfied if assad falls, that would be a disastrous deal for the west but it is one iran could well angle for and tying it all together is very much behind the idea of hosting peace talks among the syrian factions. >> eric: do you think that is a deal the obama administration would take? and could be offered? >> well, let me be clear. i think it is a disastrous deal but yes, i think the obama administration would be inclined to take it. since their diplomacy, both with respect to iran's nuclear weapons program and the ongoing civil war in syria, has been such a failure. being able to amass a successive diplomacy would give them something, even though the end result i think would be very, very risky for the united states and israel and our arab friends in the region serving it comes as the panetta report came out which is troubling, potentially, they are developing a missile that they think could hit the united states within three years. i mean, that report, ambassador, w
nations involved, thereby, denying the united states an opportunity to intervene. but the u.s. has been pushing china to join a multi-lateral framework with asean claimants to draw up legally binding code of conducts. u.s. engagement with groups such as the asean regional forum reflects a shift in foreign policy under the obama administration. the asia-pacific is now the focus of american economic and military strategy. that means potential flash points including the south china sea are of increasing concern to washington, especially when it comes to the military presence of china. nhk world's anthony yazaki reports. >> reporter: u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton arrived in phnom penh on wednesday afternoon. the first item on the agenda was a meeting with the foreign minister from asean where they exchanged views on the region's most delicate topic, the territorial disputes over the south china sea. >> i ask in my country why i put so much emphasis on asean, i tell them we work with asean on issues of central importance to the united states from maritime security to economic growt
held a press conference pushing for strict regulations. >> translator: it is difficult for us to control regional conflicts in which small weapons are used. we in japan must create an environment in which we can contribute to peace-building. >> reporter: but the key players are big weapon producers such as the united states. the u.s. is the world's biggest weapons exporter, accounting for one-third of the total value of global arms shipment. washington initially opposed the treaty. but president obama reversed that position. his administration is not so forthcoming on some of the scope of the treaty, though, such as small arms or ammunition. guns are very popular in the u.s. a new poll indicates more than 40% of american households own a gun. some lawmakers resist any international law that might, in their view, infringe american people's constitutional right to arm themselves. the u.s. is also the biggest exporter of ammunition and produces over seven billion rounds a year. the country has resisted the proposed inclusion of ammunition in the scope of the treaty on the ground
when former u.s. president jimmy carter visited the north in 1994. analysts also suggest north korean authorities are hoping that by polishing the image of the young kim as a married man, they'll defuse concerns about the new leader's inexperience. >>> investors seem to be showing more confidence in the euro. ai uchida joins us from the business team, good morning. what's happening this morning? >> good morning, catherine. investors have their hopes pinned on the european central bank, because the president of the ecb expressed his resolve to safeguard the euro. mario draghi's remarks lifted the currency's value and boosted share prices. >> the ecb is ready to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro. and believe me, it will be enough. >> draghi was speaking at a conference in london. he also commented on the high borrowing costs of some national bonds. he suggested the bank will take action if necessary. market players took his comments to mean that the ecb will buy spanish government bonds as well as bonds of other financially troubled nations. >>> as a result the euro rallied agai
in damascus but in syria as a whole. they are wrong to underestimate us. >> these street fighting pictures and damascus were not filled by rebels, they are from state television. a tacit admission by the regime of house serious situation has become. -- of how serious the situation has become. the violence has crept in from outlying districts like these. last night, the barracks of the presidential palace were set ablaze. this morning's blast was a place presume to be a secure stronghold. >> this sent a message to the regime that the hands of the syrian people can reach any one side of damascus and even bashar al-assad. he is not safe anymore. >> but the regime still commands a powerful and ruthless security apparatus. this is worrying to the rest of the world. >> this is a situation round of the spinning out of control. for that reason, it is extremely important that the international community, working with other countries, have concerns in that area, have to bring maximum pressure on assad. >> the opposition smells victory. they have been celebrating the attacks as most have lost faith i
deliberately tried to harm passengers headed for the u.s. talking about six sewing needles hidden in six turkey sandwiches. >> things like this, i call malicious product tampering are done because there is is either some personal vendetta against the company. this may be some union or other activity prompting some type of work issue. it's trying to get back at management, other employees or the bottom line of the company. >> one of the needles stuck into the tongue of the passenger we just heard from. but another man had the roof of his mouth punctured. four more needles were found in similar meals to atlanta and seattle including one actually found by an air marshall. they were all lucky. if swallows a needle could lacerate the esophagus, the stomach, the intestines and that would be quite serious. shep. >> shepard: at delta they are probably thinking what in the world? how do you protect against this? >> it's a tough one for them. they have launched their own investigation. they have issued this statement, quote: delta has taken immediate action with our in-flight caterer at amsterdam to ens
and give access for both of us to reach the school and doctors for our children. in our part of the world, women have been active since the beginning of the last century. a driving change, because they were not ashamed to care for others, and they were not afraid of giving without taking in return. in arabic we have a saying. women are very strong. when they say they will do something, they will do it, in spite of all the obstacles. if you think this is important in daily life, consider how important it is in negotiations. in issues of life and death, war and peace. we are remarkable communicators. we listen to people, consult, empathize, understand different points of view. that's why we can build relationships. when i see a boy walking to school, i pick him up in my car and give him a lift. it doesn't matter to me whose child this is. he is part of a community and i care about him. only with this mentality can negotiations be accepted by the people whose future they will affect. that's the key that's often missing. women make a difference. not just at the negotiating table but also afte
>> bret: he bumper stickers? maybe? thanks for inviting us into your home tonight. that is it for "special report," fair, balanced and unafraid. drop me a tweet at bret baier, maybe i will tweet back. you never know. >> this is "the fox report." tonight, the u.s. government is forced to release a first round of records on drones in the united states. so why were mississippi state university, cornell university, and the town of otter tail minnesota given the okay to fly them? plus, airline foods may not always taste so great. but they are not usually this dangerous. >> i took three bites out of the sandwich, and bit down hard on something that i thought was a bone. >> shepard: it wasn't a bone. it was a sowing needle. he wasn't the only passenger to get one. tonight, the investigation and delta's response. plus, desperate steps in the search for two missing children. >> we have two missing girls and we have no idea why. >> we just want the girls back. >> shepard: workers now draining a lake in hopes of finding clues. >> the lake is currently dropping at a rate of ab
dozens of u.s. military bases and strike israel within minutes. this coming from a general in iran's revolutionary guard. cons week, their military carrying out large-scale war games. they are testing a medium range missile on mockups of american bases. and while iranian military leaders claim they could hit american targets within about 1300 miles, the defense experts say iran's military is no match for the u.s. of course, iran and much of the west have been in a diplomatic standoff over that nation's nuclear program. the iranians claiming the program is for peaceful purposes but many around the world doubt it. and another threat, which we have heard before, iran now saying it will stop certain oil tankers in the strait of hormuz, which would effect the delivery of one fifth of the world's oil supply. the u.s. already moving military assets to that region to counter any potential attack. jennifer griffin live with the news in washington tonight. jennifer, how seriously is the pentagon taking this latest threat to hit our bases? >> well, they're mindful, harris. this is the third d
go on and stand up and let us hear from you from your perspective. >> thanks. i'm from palestine. to give me this chance to be this evening in front of you. 22 years ago i was -- it was a month after my marriage and the second time in my life i had been at a peaceful action. i was waiting to see what would happen to me. when my back began to hurt, soldiers took me in handcuffs to a hospital. the doctors there told the soldier to remove the cuffs in the hospital. i was no more or less than a patient he needed to heal. when the doctor examined me, he found that i was pregnant. thanks to him, he asked them to release me immediately. and i go down next day. the doctor is the kind of person i have met often in the conflict. israeli and palestinians connecting -- sorry. the kind of person i have met often in the conflict, israeli and palestinians, connecting with one another as human beings. living next to one another in peace, two peoples, two states. of course, in conflict, not every conflict is easy. but i remember the day i finally newspaper without no doubts that the only way forw
though it can typically go further, up to 1200 miles. the u.s. has been positioning patriot missile batteries across the region to protect their bases, harris. >> well, which western targets are most at risk at this point? >> well, there is the fifth fleet base in bahrain and united arab emirates and qatar. 30,000 u.s. troops in the gulf. the commander of revolutionary guards aerospace division said today quote, these bases are all in range of our missiles and the occupied lands. he was referring to israel are also good targets for us. western oil tankers are also targets, especially u.s. and european flag tankers making their way through the strait of hormuz. iran has threatened to target anyone oil elm bar go that began on july 1st. today we heard that kenya is canceling agreement to buy 4 million tons of crude a year 40 billion a day in light new sanctions, harris. >> harris: diplomatically along what they have said stick to the sanctions to keep them to work. one agency breaking saxes to iran. >> eu sanctions. and we're now learning that a wing of the u.n. that is responsible fo
crime in chicago is down, and so is crime nationally. the police here tell us that july is the worst month for murders, saturday the worst day, 9:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. the worst hour. today the mayor announced a new attack on gangs and we'll have our interview with the mayor in just a moment. but we'll start with this last weekend. 17 new shootings, and dean reynolds was at the hospital to meet them. >> reporter: at the cook county trauma unit in chicago's strojer hospital, one ambulance after another delivers victims of the gang violence that just won't stop. >> we'll be doing a whole bunch to you right now. >> reporter: this unit treats about 1,500 gunshots and stabbings a year. >> stop that! >> reporter: in the first six months of this year, chicago had 22% more murders than new york, a city with five and a half million more people. >> we have to assume the worst case. >> reporter: in the midst of the mayhem is dr. fred starr, who was in charge of the unit this weekend. >> i've seen more people probably this year who have been caught in the cross fire or caught a stray bullet and
.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. a record-setting heat wave in the eastern u.s. is starting to ease after two weeks of scorching temperatures. the heat wave has been blamed for causing at least 74 deaths from the midwest to the east coast, including 18 people around chicago and 13 people in maryland. all-time highs hit major cities including philadelphia, washington, said louis, indianapolis, and louisville, with more than 4500 heat records broken overall. dry conditions and a lack of rain are also devastating corn crops across the plains, which faces its worst drought in 25 years. although eastern states will see a respite, western states are facing a potential heat wave that could bring record highs later this week. to see our coverage of the latest u.s. heat wave and global warming, go to democracynow.org. president obama is expected to resume a long-running dispute with republicans to the of the bush era tax cuts that favor the wealthy and plunge the nation as a further deficit. in a rose garden address, obama will renew his call to limit the tax cuts extension to those
. >> knowing that your positive, they're going to shame you, discriminate against u.s. and so forth, so people shy away. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. samangan of forces are continuing their bombardment of the city of aleppo ahead of a widely expected all-out assault to uproot rebel fighters. hundreds of troops are said to have massed on the city's outskirts as syrian gunships pound several neighborhoods. rebel forces have launched attacks on army checkpoints around the city. a number of people were reported dead in clashes on thursday, the exact amount is impossible to verify. in washington, state department spokesperson victoria nuland said the u.s. fears a new massacre in aleppo will occur. >> the concern is we will see a massacre in aleppo, and that is what the regime appears to be lining up for. aleppo, as you said, has been bombarded by syrian fighter jets. it is the latest desperate effort of the al-assad regime to hold on to control. there are credible reports of tanks prepared to attack the cit
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 526 (some duplicates have been removed)

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